TAHAL refocusing on emerging markets

Refocusing of markets outcome of new strategic plan; Beit Tahal sold to the insurance company Phoenix

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20/01/2013

Saar Bracha, TAHAL's CEO, said at the signing of the agreement for sale of the property - which stood empty for the past two years - that the sale would  help develop and promote projects in the geographic markets where the company has decided to focus.

TAHAL is focused in emerging markets such as Angola, Ghana and China, according to a strategic plan prepared by the consulting firm Shaldor. The company manages three projects in Ghana of cumulative amount of 143 million euros, and two projects in the water and agriculture in Angola 182 million euros.

Full article in Hebrew 


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Battle in the Skies

From struggles around the "open skies" agreement, through employees unwilling to compromise, to the image of an expensive company. Where will El Al fly to in 2013?

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10.01.2013

Eight years after privatization, the national airline El Al has improved its image, amazes with its marketing gimmicks and even boasts encouraging results for the third quarter of 2012, but it has not completed the mental transition to a normal commercial private company. It still has not settled its relationship with employees, who according to the tradition of government companies are divided into classes of first generation and second generation, of pilots against everyone else, of temporary and permanent. It has not stopped  explaining the national importance of its existence, especially in times of war and siege, when no other company will fly here. It still fights with government over spending on security, and still suffers from an image of a company with high prices.

As part of the strategic change planned with the assistance of Shaldor, along with improving long-haul flights, El Al will be adopting a different format for short flights.

On short-haul lines, some people around the company contend, "the company is certainly no more expensive than other companies, its prices are around market average. El Al's Boeing 737 planes are also less crowded with 148 seats, while competitors on the same routes with the same plane have 156 seats. But it's hard to fight reputations." However, as part of the strategic change planned  by the company with the assistance of consulting company Shaldor, along with improving long-haul flights, El Al will be adopting a different format for short flights.

Full article in Hebrew 


Competition in spare parts has yet to benefit drivers

Prices for chassis parts have fallen, cutting costs for insurers and leasing companies but not consumers.

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17.12.2012

New signs of change are in the air in the market for spare car parts. Importer Delek Motors has dropped its prices for Mazda 2 and Ford Focus spares by 58% and 48%, respectively. At Colmobil, importer of Mercedes and Hyundai cars, front wings for Hyundai Accent are now going for 45% less than they were last January, while Telcar has dropped the costs of Daihatsu Sirion spares by 50%.

The reason for these sharp reductions is simple: growing competition. Each of these items now has a cheaper alternative. This is partly due to the easing of import restrictions by the Transportation Ministry, announced earlier this year, in an attempt to open up the market.

In its investigation of the industry, the Finance Ministry hired the services of the consulting firm Shaldor, which found that competition among car importers was fair and that the problems lay in the spare parts market.

However, despite this dramatic and surprising turn of events, the consumer has yet to see the difference in his bills. Most price reductions were in chassis parts, used mainly for repairs following accidents. These are purchased mainly by insurance companies who, so far, are the main beneficiaries of the new regulations. Supposedly, this should be reflected soon in lower premiums.

But are the current changes harbingers of a new era for consumers? Apparently not, according to knowledgeable sources in the auto industry. In its investigation of the industry, the Finance Ministry hired the services of the consulting firm Shaldor, which found that competition among car importers was fair and that the problems lay in the spare parts market.

Once a new or used car is purchased, says the report, the supply of spares is limited to either original expensive parts made by the vehicle's manufacturer, or cheap, low quality ones. Shaldor found that spares' prices for new models are higher than overseas by 80% to 120%. The finance and transportation ministries recognized this, stating in a report that "car importers in Israel have a controling impact beyond what is acceptable in other countries, leading to higher prices compared to overseas." The situation is due to structural flaws in this market niche.

Full article in English or in Hebrew


A Strategic Planning Unit will be set up in the Prime Minister's Office, will be responsible for reforms

The committee for determining Israel's strategic planning will this week present its conclusions to Netanyahu ■ Ministry of Finance, which is now the main strategic planner, agrees to the move ■ among other things,  a broad set of objectives will be developed, including measures of quality and sustainability

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13.10.2012

The committee for determining Israel's strategic planning was appointed two years ago by the Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, heard dozens of experts, and operated with two strategy consulting firms  - RAND Corporation and Shaldor.

The Strategic Planning Committee was assisted by Shaldor and RAND to examine what was done in the areas of strategic planning around the world. Through international benchmarking, and conversations with many government officials, past and present, the Committee reached agreement on the principles required for long-term strategic planning in Israel. 


"Most developed countries have adopted the model of Communications Authority. Israel left behind"

Research commissioned by the Treasury supports once again the necessity of a communications authority, arguing that its establishment will lead to increased investment. "Implementation of the independent regulator model is crucial to the market." The Minister of Communications tries to lead to its establishment.

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04.07.2012

Is it possible that this time, in Moshe Kahlon's relatively long and productive term, a communications authority will be established in Israel? The Ministry of Finance hopes so and commissioned research.  The research was conducted by Shaldor, which specializes in business strategy, and whose previous work has prepared the ground and broke the way for most cellular industry reforms in recent years. Now, the Treasury hopes that the study and its conclusions can pave the way for historic reform. 

The Ministry of Finance commissioned a study by Shaldor, whose previous work has prepared the ground and broke the way for most cellular industry reforms in recent years. Now, the Treasury hopes that the study and its conclusions can pave the way for historic reform once again.

Shaldor's research answers in detail the question of why a communications authority is necessary: "developed countries choose to move to a model of independent regulation, because of several built-in advantages: 1. Professionalism: expertise in decisions, with no short-term political calculations; 2. certainty and consistency: creating a more certain and predictable environment investors; 3. objectivity and fairness: the separation of the supervisor from those under supervision (state-owned)."

The study argued that "Implementation of the independent regulator model is essential to the development of the communications market and leads to an increase in telecom investments." The argument is that as the regulator is more independent and more transparent, so that companies spend more - one of the ultimate goals of the Ministry of Communications - encouraging investment. 

Full article in Hebrew 


Young and promising / / entrepreneurs, executives and businessmen - meet The Marker's promising young leaders for 2012

Ambition, curiosity, a sense of mission and social responsibility motivate our team this year. Meet the people who have driven change, led revolutions, explored and created new initiatives in the past year. And their future still lies ahead of them.

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03.07.2012

Omer Teper
Behind the Reform of the Cellular Phone Market

Title: VP at Shaldor Strategy Consulting.

Age and marital status: 38, married +2.

Resume: Undergraduate studies in mathematics and economics at Tel Aviv University. In 2000, Omer joined Shaldor consulting firm, while completing graduate studies in Business Administration at Tel Aviv University. Significant experience consulting for Israeli companies on globalization and expansion into new markets. In recent years, Omer worked with government agencies in promoting reforms, including in communication and transport. Omer helped design the reform of the cellular phone market and the fiber optic project of the IEC.

What is a significant moment in your career? The financial crisis of 2008-2009 sharpened my understanding that what was is not necessarily what will be.

What would you change in your field? The difficulties, complexities and burdens of the profession are what make it interesting and challenging.

What would you do if you were not in your current role? Become an entrepreneur.

What is the best professional advice you ever received? Speak without fear, even when new ideas are not yet widely accepted and may upset people.

What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to continue to influence major decision-making processes, deal with intellectual and managerial challenges, learn and grow.

Full article in Hebrew